Injuries In Young Athletes – What Parents Can Look For

Injuries In Young Athletes – What Parents Can Look For

As a parent, it’s tough to watch your student athlete get benched due to an injury. They want nothing more than to get out there and play, and you love to cheer them on. As a new season approaches and we start gearing up for spring sports, it tends to be a busy time of year. More physical activity, more training, more equipment, and more parent taxis taking kids to practice.

Along with those weekend games and after school practices, we see a lot more injuries. More often than not, injuries tend to go unnoticed (or unmentioned by your child) and eventually lead to worsening conditions. These are sometimes referred to as musculoskeletal injuries, usually caused by trauma or overuse. Understanding these possible injuries and their signs is the first step to keeping your child safe, and on the field.

Injuries In Young Athletes – What Parents Can Look For

Coopersville Athletic Trainer Mackenzie Delgado is pictured with the girls volleyball team.

“One of my soccer players injured her ankle playing basketball and it wasn’t healing on its own as quickly as we had hoped. I knew if she didn’t get in for physical therapy that she’d certainly be benched once soccer started. Within a few therapy sessions her ankle began showing significant signs of improvement. At this rate, I’m certain she’ll be ready once soccer practice starts.” Mackenzie Delgado, Coopersville Public Schools Athletic Trainer

Injuries In Young Athletes – What Parents Can Look For

Here are some signs of young athlete injuries for parents to watch out for:

  • Overuse Injury
    Watch for gradual pain, stiffness, aching, visible swelling, and tenderness. Our Functional Movement Screens identify the weak link and correct it by looking at fundamental movement patterns, which are the foundation for proper fitness and performance.
  • ACL Injuries
    Watch for popping sounds, immediate pain/weakness, and loss of motion. Our sports rehab specialists will help your student athlete heal faster and regain strength so they can get back in the game.
  • Sprains
    Watch for general pain, swelling, warmth, bruising, redness, and impaired movement. Our complimentary injury screenings are a great way to talk to a physical therapist, free of charge, to find out what’s causing the issue and the next best steps. Whether it’s a sprain, a twist, or just general pain, we’re here to help. Rather than doing research online and attempting to self-diagnose, come in and talk with a licensed physical therapist who can explain what’s going on and get your young athlete back in the game with the proper treatment.
  • Concussion
    Watch for headaches, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea, and blurry vision. Because no two concussions are the same, our exam is essential to assess your child’s individual symptoms and limitations. We’ll then design a treatment program especially for you.

Injuries In Young Athletes – What Parents Can Look For

Talk to your kids
It’s important to be as open with your kids as possible. Make it a point to teach them about playing smart and to encourage proper warm-up procedures. By opening the door, children are more likely to talk about their pain without fearing the possible repercussions of sitting out. Be sure to follow up with any major falls and blunt force blows to the body. Regular pre-participation physicals are also vital for sports season and renewed confidence of your child’s wellbeing.

“My son was experiencing unexplained elbow pain and we were worried that it would affect his game. The school’s athletic trainer, Tyler DeBrot, recommended we give physical therapy a try. After just a few treatment sessions the elbow pain was gone and my son’s game was back to normal. Undergoing physical therapy treatment got him back on the court faster – I’m so glad we gave PT a try!” – Grant Parent

Our team of sports rehab experts and athletic trainers are here for your family, at every stage in the game. Young athlete injuries are often easily treated, especially when caught early on. If your child is experiencing any kind of pain, schedule a free consultation to talk with a physical therapist. Because Michigan is a Direct Access state, you don’t need a referral from your physician prior to seeking physical therapy treatment. Contact us with any questions you have, we’re happy to help!

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Injuries In Young Athletes – What Parents Can Look For

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